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Being Good Enough

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Several years ago my daughter played the cello when she was in elementary school and it thrilled me to no end. The sound of the cello resonates deep in my body. It’s melancholy, and I hear it sing a sad song of yearning and longing for the beloved.

It is truly my favorite instrument – and she was damn good.

So when the kiddo switched to the clarinet, well . . . that was a sad day for me. And when I was required to complete a heartfelt project in the second year of my Master’s Program, I decided that it was time for me to give it shot and learn to play.

I was pretty nervous about this undertaking. I’d not played any instrument since I took piano lessons as a child and over the years had developed a misbelief that I was not creative enough to play anything.

And not only would I be learning to play the cello in a few short months, but there were rumors that I just might possibly perform in front of my 200-person class at the end of the year . . .

So off I went. I hired an amazing cello instructor named Emily at Baxter Northrup, rented a beautiful cello that I named Neda, and met with my Project Team mates (Alycia Schlesinger and Jenny Caruso) twice a month for mutual support.

I practiced in hiding at first because I was embarrassed about my playing but with my husband’s encouragement, I quickly learned to ignore the negative self-talk and moved from the bedroom to the living room for my evening routine.

During our Project Team meetings, I shared with Alycia and Jenny all of the fears and judgments that surfaced about myself while pushing my edge this way. They all boiled down to “I wasn’t good enough.”

The final criteria to fulfill my project was to perform in front of my Project Team – easy – they loved me and cheered me on the entire time. As we neared the end of the year though, I started to wonder what it might be like to actually perform in front of my large class.

When the time came, I signed up to perform for the class on the final day (with everyone else who opted to present their completed project). I was terrified. I couldn’t sleep well the night before. I asked myself, “Who are you and why in the world are you doing this??”

I somehow managed to make it to class, walk up on stage with my heart pounding, coherently say some kind of introduction to the class, and play.

And here’s the thing: I was pretty bad. I didn’t practice enough as I probably should have and I sat up there squeaking away. I knew when I decided to perform that my playing wasn’t going to sound that great and some of my notes were going to be off. But I wanted to challenge myself anyway. Could I get up there and let others see me unpolished and imperfect?

As I played the last note, I looked up and saw my fellow classmates erupt into a standing ovation. It went on for a long while as I bowed in gratitude. I remember looking over at my husband, Alycia, and Jenny and seeing all three of them crying. I could see on their faces how proud they were of me. It was a pretty special moment.

I left the stage thinking, “Wow! I just did that!” and I was high the rest of the day. This was a significant stretch for the introvert who prefers to be in the background. Students congratulated me all weekend and several thanked me. One person said, “I realized when I saw you up there that I didn’t have to be perfect and that was freeing.”

I’ve become a fan of being good enough, of ignoring the whispers of ego-perfection, of letting whoever I am in the moment be just fine.

12 Comments

  1. A very memorable and inspiring day! I still tear up thinking about you up there.

  2. So beautiful! I admire that you did that and I feel inspired to choose my instrument and go for it!!!

  3. Elana: Thanks for the post. I really needed to read that last sentence today. Thinking of you guys and hopefully I will see you in NJ in 2014. oxo

  4. Beautiful, Elana!

  5. Your story is so inspiring. I’ve always been so hard on myself about how imperfectly I have been as a mother. I once had a therapist tell me that I’ve been a good enough mother. It took such a load off my shoulders. Reading this reminds me that I usually do my best, and, no matter how it looks or sounds, that’s good enough. ♡♡♡

    • Thank you, Susan. Yes, that’s another “good enough” opportunity I’ve dealt with myself. “Have I been a good mother?” Past time to let that one go.

  6. Thank you Elana, for your words…your story…that so eloquently speak of courage and the boldness it takes to breakthrough our historical embodied narrative of NOT ENOUGH. Your words will serve as inspiration as I, too continue to STEP OUt from beach the scene onto my edge. An edge that does not require that I have it ALL PERFECT! This year I am being called to self publish a total of three poetic journals. And my response is YES I WILL!

    Today your words…your story… finding its way to me is no accident, and my felt sense knowing is that its time to LET GO of an old way of being that tends to keep me onSTAND BY mode. And it begins with letting go of “not enough” conditioned tendency and move on gifting the world with my poetic sensibilities! THANK YOU Elana! PLAY ON and continue to bring the music that you are to the world!

    • Thank you for your kind words! That historical narrative can be powerful and paralyzing if we let it. And . . . YES you will!

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